header

AngliasaloonEstateVanPick UpTorinoConvertibleKit CarsSpecials
AdvertsArticlesBooksBuyingForgottenHistoryLegalLinksMisc
ModelsMoviesMy CarPhotosPoliceRacingHistoryStoriesTechnical


You are in:

History
Anglia Engine

Ford Anglia 105E - Engine

The “All New Ford Anglia 105E ” of 1959 not only had an attractive, new and unique body style, it also sported a new four cylinder overhead valve (OHV) type engine with a cast iron cylinder head and block. This new engine finally allowed Ford to break away from the old side valve units, which had powered the previous 100E small car range.

The Anglia 105E Engine featured overhead valves and “over-square” dimensions with bore and stroke measurements of 80.963mm x 48.412mm respectively. The new engine had a cubic capacity of 996.6cc and developed 39bhp at 5000 rpm, which pushed the new Anglia along at a respectable speed for 1959.

Anglia Engine

In addition to its “over-square” cylinder dimensions, a further unusual feature (for the time) of the engine was an externally mounted combined oil filter/pump unit designed to facilitate efficient low-cost production.

By leaving the bore unchanged and extending the stroke, Ford developed a larger engine for the Anglia to compete with its rivals at the time. This new engine had a capacity of 1200cc and the Anglia became known as the Anglia 123E. This new engine also found a home in the Mk1 and early M2 Ford Cortina’s.

Anglia Engine

Specifications of the 997cc and 1198cc Engines.

997 cc engine Specifications
Type 4-cylinder in line overhead valve type
Bore 3.1875 in (80.963 mm)
Stroke 1.906 in (48.412 mm)
Cubic Capacity 60.84 cu in (996.6 cc)
Compression Ratio 8.9 to 1 Standard. For Premium Grade Fuel
7.5 to 1 Optional. For Regular Grade Fuel
Cylinder Head Detachable cast iron type. Fully machined combustion chambers.
Valves Vertical overhead type, push rod operated
Valve Clearance 0.010 in (0.254 mm) inlet
0.017 in (0.432 mm) exhaust
Normal running temperature
Firing Order 1, 2, 4, 3
Maximum Brake Horse Power 39 at 5,000 RPM (8.9 C.R)
(Nett) 37 at 5,000 RPM (7.5 C.R)
Maximum Torque 52.85 lb ft at 2,700 RPM (8.9 C.R)
(Nett) 50.43 lb ft at 2,700 RPM (7.5 C.R)

1198 cc engine Specifications
Type 4-cylinder in line overhead valve type
Bore 3.1875 in (80.963 mm)
Stroke 2.29 in (58.17 mm)
Cubic Capacity 73.09 cu in (1,198 cc)
Compression Ratio 8.7 to 1 Standard. For Premium Grade Fuel
7.3 to 1 Optional. For Regular Grade Fuel
Cylinder Head Detachable cast iron type. Fully machined combustion chambers.
Valves Vertical overhead type, push rod operated
Valve Clearance 0.010 in (0.254 mm) inlet
0.017 in (0.432 mm) exhaust
Normal running temperature
Firing Order 1, 2, 4, 3
Maximum Brake Horse Power 48.5 at 4,800 RPM (8.7 C.R)
(Nett) 46 at 4,800 RPM (7.3 C.R)
Maximum Torque 63 lb ft at 2,700 RPM (8.7 C.R)
(Nett) 60 lb ft at 2,700 RPM (7.3 C.R)

By continuing along this path, Ford extended the stroke even more to create the 1340cc and 1500cc engines, which would ultimately be used in its new car range at the time.

The engine is now referred to as the pre-crossflow, to differentiate it from the later crossflow engines used in the Anglia’s successor, the Escort. The names refer to the location of the inlet and exhaust manifold on each engine. The 105E Engine or pre-crossflow, have both the inlet and exhaust manifolds on the same side, whereas the crossflow has the inlet and exhaust manifolds on opposite sides of the engine.

Shown below is a Crossflow Engine retro fitted into an Anglia

Anglia Crossflow Engine

Other Manufacturers (including Ford) saw the potential of the Ford Anglia 105E Engine and used it as the motive power within their own specialist bodywork. These vehicles ranged from small two seater sports cars to four door saloons.

Continuing on this theme the Ford Anglia 105E Engine was marinised by various Companies and used as inboard motors to power motor cruisers and riverboats.

Over the years, some people have found the original 997cc a little on the slow side and have found different ways (and engines) to propel the little Anglia along at a quicker pace.

(Article Copyright MellY Designs - Please do not Reproduce without Permission)

TopHistoryEmail Me